1. Tunefox.com
  2. Banjo songs
  3. Cherokee Shuffle

Cherokee Shuffle banjo tabs

Back
  • Tablatures
    Banjo Cherokee Shuffle tab

    Scruggs Style

    Traditional

    • Difficulty
    • Key
      G
    • Tempo
      125 bpm
    • Tuning
      gDGBD

    Try making the chords in the B section all 7th chords! This will make the song sound a lot more bluesy, and give you some more improvisation ideas!

    Learn
  • Melodic Style

    Traditional

    • Difficulty
    • Key
      G
    • Tempo
      125 bpm
    • Tuning
      gDGBD

    This is a high break to Cherokee Shuffle that has some advanced right and left hand techniques.

    Learn
  • Backup

    Traditional

    • Difficulty
    • Key
      G
    • Tempo
      125 bpm
    • Tuning
      gDGBD

    This backup version of Cherokee Shuffle mixes vamping and rolling to give you ideas on how to make your backup fluid and interesting both for you and your jam buddies!

    Learn

More about Cherokee Shuffle

Banjo player Howard Bursen and many others have identified "Cherokee Shuffle" as a West Coast version of “Lost Indian” which could be traced back to fiddler Tommy Magness's recording of it in the 1930s. However, it was Tommy Jackson who later transformed the Magness’s Lost Indian into Cherokee shuffle. He added a distinctive second part and changed the key to "A." Many fiddlers took Tommy’s addition to the earlier version and infused it into Magness tune.

There are two main versions of Cherokee Shuffle in circulation and one of them has ‘A’ and ‘B’ part with the same length, while the other doesn’t.



Learn 3 different versions of Cherokee Shuffle, which are all shown on this page. We recommend that you get started with the Scruggs style version, where you’ll learn basic roll pattern and left-hand articulations like slides, hammer-ons, and pull-offs. Next, move on to the Melodic arrangement to learn how to play the melody for Cherokee Shuffle using scales and up the next positions. Lastly, you can check out the Backup arrangement, which shows you how to play behind others while they are soloing.

In every Tunefox tablature arrangement you'll find measures where you can switch out licks to see different options to use for your improvisation. This feature is called the Lick Switcher. How do you find the Lick Switcher? Look for text that says "Original Measure" over different measures in the Cherokee Shuffle tab you are learning and click on that text. It'll open up the Lick Switcher where you can select a substitute measure for that spot in the song. You'll find that there are different styles of licks like Scruggs, Melodic, Bluesy, and more. Want to see a completely different version of this song? Click on "Shuffle Licks" on the bottom of tool panel to randomly shuffle the licks in the song.

There are a number of fantastic learning tools in Tunefox to help you memorize, learn by ear, and improve your speed. These special features are found in the "Tools" menu at the bottom right of your screen. The "Hide Notes" tool will hide a number of the notes in the tab so you can use your ears to learn parts of the melody of the Cherokee Shuffle. Next, try out the "Memory Train" tool, which will hide more and more notes each time the song or measure loops. This will help get you off of the tab you’ve been working with so you can play it by memory. The "Speed Up" feature gradually speeds up the song so you can hone your technique and challenge yourself to go faster.

Using backing tracks for practice should be an essential part of every musician’s routine. With Tunefox, you can practice Cherokee Shuffle as fast or as slow as you want and mix the volume of the tracks with the instrument to your liking. There’s also a metronome so you can always feel the pulse of the song with or without the band track playing along.

Members can export their arrangements into PDF, allowing them to print and bring them to their next jam session.